Outlook breach reportedly targeted Crypto users

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We previously notified our readers of a breach involving Microsoft Outlook email. Users of Cryptocurrency are now coming forward to indicate that this Outlook breach led to a theft by hackers of their Cryptocurrency from various Cryptocurrency Exchanges, as detailed in this follow-up article.

Keeping anything online, whether it be email or items like Cryptocurrency, leaves a user open to potential hacks. It is wise to copy email to a folder on the user’s computer vs. leaving it online in an inbox or the like for hackers to gain access to. When stored in a folder on a personal computer, it’s much harder to access.

Also, enabling verification items like 2fa (Two-factor authorization), where a user is required to verify log-ins and other procedures using an application on their phone, are wise to use to prevent access to user accounts. As one user indicated in the article, they did not have 2fa enabled on their account, so it allowed the hackers easier access.

If you’d like to discuss further on ways you can protect yourself online, please let us know!

Microsoft admits hackers had access to online email

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For the first three months of 2019, Microsoft has admitted that hackers had access to some details of certain Outlook.com email accounts. As this article states, Outlook.com is the web version of Microsoft’s email service, and this online service was previously known as Hotmail. Per Microsoft, “this unauthorized access could have allowed unauthorized parties to access and/or view information related to your email account …but not the content of any emails or attachments.”

While it appears no actual emails were read or attachments were accessed, this is an important reminder that being online brings its share of risks to user data. It’s a smart idea to use an actual email application to view email, in companion with a web browser, and to store as much email off-line as possible. This will help in prevention of potential data access in the event your email account gets hacked.

In relation to this, and as has been mentioned before, it is important to ensure the safeguarding of passwords, for email and other sites. It is good practice to change passwords periodically throughout the year. By doing so, there’s less of a chance that the current password is in the hands of hackers if it is changed more often, in the event an account is compromised. Also, never send password or login information via email, as this just opens user’s data to easily being compromised.

As always, please contact us if you have questions or would like to discuss further!

Mail users reporting issues with Gmail after macOS update

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As noted on a number of complaints across Apple related sites, the newest update of macOS (10.14.4), which was released a few days ago, causes issues with authentication when attempting to sign into a user’s Gmail account. Users are reporting receiving an endless loop, bouncing between macOS and Google’s sign-in page in Safari.

Because of this, it is recommended not to upgrade to OS 10.14.4 if you use Gmail within your Mail application until Apple releases an update and it’s verified as a fix for the issue.

It appears this is a verified issue per discussions on the Apple Support site. Attempting to use a different browser such as Chrome does not succeed as a work-around, as the Mail application interacts directly with Safari in this process.

Apple Mail can also exhibit other intermittent issues for some users, such as not showing a message as replied-to where a user had just replied. If you are noticing any odd issues such as this, restart your Mail application.

You can read more about the Mail/Gmail 10.14.4 issue here. As always, if you need assistance, we’re here to help!