Mail users reporting issues with Gmail after macOS update

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As noted on a number of complaints across Apple related sites, the newest update of macOS (10.14.4), which was released a few days ago, causes issues with authentication when attempting to sign into a user’s Gmail account. Users are reporting receiving an endless loop, bouncing between macOS and Google’s sign-in page in Safari.

Because of this, it is recommended not to upgrade to OS 10.14.4 if you use Gmail within your Mail application until Apple releases an update and it’s verified as a fix for the issue.

It appears this is a verified issue per discussions on the Apple Support site. Attempting to use a different browser such as Chrome does not succeed as a work-around, as the Mail application interacts directly with Safari in this process.

Apple Mail can also exhibit other intermittent issues for some users, such as not showing a message as replied-to where a user had just replied. If you are noticing any odd issues such as this, restart your Mail application.

You can read more about the Mail/Gmail 10.14.4 issue here. As always, if you need assistance, we’re here to help!

Google urges Chrome users to upgrade to latest version

Due to a security vulnerability, Google is urging users of their Chrome web browser to update to the latest version. As the article mentions in the first link below, Chrome updates are usually automatically performed.

To see the current version of Chrome on a Mac, you can access the Chrome menu in the top left while in the browser and choose “About Google Chrome”. The second of two links below explains how to check if on a Windows-based PC.

This is another example of ensuring that your software is kept up to date.

https://www.pcmag.com/news/367015/stop-what-youre-doing-and-update-google-chrome

https://www.pcmag.com/feature/364079/how-to-update-google-chrome/2

Hackers use malicious Windows file to access MacOS

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Hackers are utilizing the file type “.exe” to unload malicious software onto MacOS powered computers. As the article linked below mentions, by default, .exe files won’t run on a Mac. The malicious download worked around this limitation by bundling the .exe file with a free framework known as Mono. Mono allows Windows executables to run on MacOS, Android, and a variety of other operating systems.

Users should be cautious of downloading any software from insecure resources such as Torrent sites. Torrent sites provide users with the ability to download any type of software, movies, games, etc, which leads to a “Wild West” scenario, where all bets are off with the type of files that you’re actually downloading.

It’s also wise to ensure children are not accessing these sites either, and to block access to Torrent resources on company networks.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2019/02/clever-trick-uses-windows-executable-file-to-install-malicious-payload-on-macs/