Cloud Data, Mobile Devices and Data Vulnerability

They would have lost several days of financial transactions if not for the local on-site backup we installed.

Fortunately we had set up an on-site backup of a customer’s DropBox (and other) data, as they came across sync issues and their company financial data was overwritten by older data. Syncing had been turned off for some reason and only the local data was modified, for days. When syncing was turned back on, the older data on DropBox overwrote the newer local data. Perhaps by customer error? Confusing user interface?

They would have lost several days of financial transactions if not for the local on-site backup we installed, taking care of their user directory (including the DropBox sync folder). We were able to restore the file to the time just before it was overwritten by the old DropBox data, viola! Hours upon hours of reentering data, maybe even losing data, all resolved in minutes.

We’ve long wondered when DropBox will get hit by something and Adobe has now proven a catastrophic loss is possible on a cloud platform. The link below describes how Adobe customers using Lightroom on iOS had all of their images and settings permanently erased. For iOS users not backing up regularly, the data is gone forever.

https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom-cc/kb/lightroom_mobile_5_4.html?red=a

Adobe users lost data and Adobe had no way to restore from a backup. This was, apparently, due to bad programming. No company is immune from this, DropBox could experience something similar.

Because of this we strongly suggest having your DropBox data (and all other cloud data) backed up by your own local system. Bad programming aside, heaven forbid DropBox suffer a hack. We’re sure they work very hard at preventing this, being a super tasty target and treasure trove of data that every foreign state must be drooling over.

Wrongful death lawsuit brought after fire allegedly caused by iPad

Firefighter using fire extinguisher on large fire

“A wrongful death lawsuit has been filed against Apple in New Jersey after a man died in an apartment fire which allegedly began when his iPad burst into flames.” As has been seen in the past, especially in the recall of Samsung phones due to higher propensity for them to catch fire, it is important to understand the risks (while fairly rare) that a Lithium Ion battery could catch fire.

Here are a few user tips to practice when charging your mobile device:

  • When charging your device, do so in an area away from flammable materials. Best to charge on a fireproof tray or other fireproof item.
  • Don’t charge your device in bed while sleeping, and don’t put it under the bed covers or pillows.
  • It is wise to not leave a device charging when you’re not near it. In the event of any issues, you want to be able to address what’s occurring as soon as possible.
  • Be aware of how hot your phone gets while in use or especially when charging. Refrain from charging for long periods of time in areas of direct sunlight or other hot places, such as on the dashboard of a car on a hot day.

Doing the above things will assist in keeping you safe. Below is the link to the article on the lawsuit for further review.