Beware mobile VPN services promoted by scam ads

VPN

It is becoming more and more popular for a user to be on a mobile device and receive pop-up windows or be otherwise directed to a site to indicate that you’ve been hacked or are being tracked, and the solutions is to install a VPN (Virtual Private Network) application. A VPN allows the user to connect to another public IP in order to mask their current IP, and encrypt data sent.

With these pop-up redirect ads, what is occurring is that various VPN providers provide affiliate programs, where individuals are compensated for driving traffic to the VPN provider. These individuals create scare-tactic ads that promote users install the VPN application, and in return, the affiliate marketer receives compensation in exchange.

As the article states, if you receive one of these warnings, just close the page. If you are having issues closing the page, close your web browser. Upon re-opening the browser, attempt to close the page if it still exists. Also, closing the page that prompted the redirection is also advised, to prevent further issues. Also, NEVER install any applications being promoted on these sites, as they could install any variety of malware onto your device.

Please let us know if you have questions or would like to discuss setting up a more secure VPN into your computing environment!

Microsoft admits hackers had access to online email

email

For the first three months of 2019, Microsoft has admitted that hackers had access to some details of certain Outlook.com email accounts. As this article states, Outlook.com is the web version of Microsoft’s email service, and this online service was previously known as Hotmail. Per Microsoft, “this unauthorized access could have allowed unauthorized parties to access and/or view information related to your email account …but not the content of any emails or attachments.”

While it appears no actual emails were read or attachments were accessed, this is an important reminder that being online brings its share of risks to user data. It’s a smart idea to use an actual email application to view email, in companion with a web browser, and to store as much email off-line as possible. This will help in prevention of potential data access in the event your email account gets hacked.

In relation to this, and as has been mentioned before, it is important to ensure the safeguarding of passwords, for email and other sites. It is good practice to change passwords periodically throughout the year. By doing so, there’s less of a chance that the current password is in the hands of hackers if it is changed more often, in the event an account is compromised. Also, never send password or login information via email, as this just opens user’s data to easily being compromised.

As always, please contact us if you have questions or would like to discuss further!

Reminder to keep passwords secure…

It is a vitally important practice to keep your passwords safe. As a general rule, never give out passwords to anyone. The article here notes that Facebook asked a user for their email login and password to verify who they were. This can open up a user to phishing attacks.

If you need to use Facebook, it is advised to create a new Gmail account and use that specifically for Facebook, rather than risking the potential of a frequently-used email account being compromised.

In addition to this, it is wise to use different and hard-to-guess passwords for different websites. Using the same password for different sites opens one up again to issues if one site’s password file gets hacked.

Feel free to discuss with us your options with keeping your passwords safe. We’re here to help!

Facebook stored users’ passwords in unsecure manner

Facebook app

Facebook stored passwords for hundreds of millions of users, exposing them for years to any person who had internal access to these password files. Passwords are usually encrypted, but errors led to some 200 million to 600 millions passwords being exposed. Passwords that were affected were for Facebook, Facebook Lite and Instagram. More information can be found here.

This is a good reminder of the importance of:

  • Changing passwords often, while making them not easily guessable
  • Using 2fa (Two Factor Authorization) applications on your mobile phone, such as Authy
  • Configuring Facebook to send you alerts in the event an unauthorized computer or mobile device logs into your account
  • Using Facebook to audit your account to see what devices are currently logged into your account, to determine if there are any that may look suspicious

If you’d like assistance with setting up any of these items, or have questions, let us know!

Web browser Firefox can now block auto-play videos

The latest version of the Mozilla browser Firefox can now block auto-play videos with sound. Chrome has previously introduced this ability, but Firefox’s has the ability to block more videos in a more user-friendly manner of setup. It can also be configured to exclude only certain sites, and include others. More can be read here.

Features such as this are good for those on limited download plans. If you’d like assistance with configuring this feature, just let us know!

Beware Malicious Internet Browser extensions

A quick summary from the article of steps to take in regards to browser extensions that can be installed for Chrome and other similar Web browsers:

  • Don’t install software that you cannot read and asks for intrusive permissions.
  • If something seems off, it probably is. Evaluate what might cause your user journey to change.
  • Periodically evaluate what extensions you have on your browser — remove those you don’t use anymore.
  • If you have an extension on your browser that you use, seek an open-source version/alternative or disable automatic updates from the Chrome store — make sure you audit the code or find someone reliable and trustworthy to.

https://medium.com/mycrypto/the-dangers-of-malicious-browser-extensions-ef9c10f0128f